Examples of Deceiving Post Catalytic Analysis

When troubleshooting an emissions failure, your primary concern will be what comes out of the tailpipe. In other words, it doesn't matter whether the efficient burn occurred in the engine or the catalyst. However, when troubleshooting a driveability concern, the catalytic converter may mask important diagnostic clues which can be gathered with your exhaust analyzer. The following are examples of situations where post-catalyst reading may be deceiving.

• Example 1: A minor misfire under load is causing a vehicle to surge. The exhaust gas from the engine would show an increase in HC and O2, and a reduction in CO2. However, once this exhaust gas reaches the catalytic converter, especially a relatively new and efficient catalyst, the oxidation process will continue. The excess HC will be oxidized, causing HC and O2 to fall, and CO2 to increase. At the tailpipe, the exhaust readings may look perfectly normal.

In this example, it is interesting to note that NOx readings will increase because of the reduced carbon monoxide and increased oxygen levels in the catalyst feed gas. This could be detected with a five gas analyzer.

• Example 2: A small exhaust leak upstream of the exhaust oxygen sensor is causing a false lean indication to the ECM. This resulted in excessively rich fuel delivery to bring oxygen sensor voltage back to normal operating range. The customer concern is a sudden decrease of 20% in fuel economy.

• Example 3: A restriction in the fuel return line elevates pressure causing an excessively rich air/fuel ratio and a 20% decrease in fuel economy. Although carbon monoxide emissions from the engine are elevated as a result of this rich air/fuel ratio, the catalytic converter is able to oxidize most of it into carbon dioxide. The resulting tailpipe readings appear to be normal, except for oxygen, which is extremely low for two reasons. First, the increase in CO caused a proportionate decrease in O2 in the converter feed gas. Second, the little oxygen left over was totally consumed oxidizing the CO into CO2.

Based on this example, you can see that oxygen is a better indicator of lean or rich air/fuel ratios than carbon monoxide when testing post catalytic converter.

Effects of A/F Ratio on Engine-Out Gases o o

Use the following graph to study the relationship A/F mixture has on exhaust gas output levels.

10 12

Richer

20 22

10 12

Richer

20 22

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